Providers

PrEP does not

PrEP does not

  • PrEP does not provide immediate protection—it must be taken daily for 7 days before it offers full protection. It should continue to be taken daily.
  • PrEP does not prevent any other sexually transmitted infections or pregnancy.
  • PrEP does not protect someone from HIV after exposure.
Why is counselling about PrEP so important?

Why is counselling about PrEP so important?

HIV-negative people interested in PrEP should receive counselling prior to PrEP initiation and at follow-up visits while they are actively taking PrEP.

The information you will find here, is a quick reference guide to support consistent counselling efforts and provide helpful reminders for important topics to cover. It is a supplement for existing counselling practice and guidelines, not a comprehensive replacement.

Starting PrEP

Starting PrEP

First visit: HIV and blood test screening. Get your PrEP supply for a month.

One month visit: HIV and blood test screening Get your 3-month prescription and collect your pills every month

Monthly visit: Use your prescription to collect your pills every month at your clinic

Every three months: Every 3 months, you return for an HIV test and a new 3-month prescription for PrEP

What is the difference between PrEP, PEP, and ART?

What is the difference between PrEP, PEP, and ART?

All three contain antiretroviral medicines in different combination for different purposes:

PrEP is a pill that has 2 anti-HIV medicines taken daily to prevent HIV for HIV-negative people. PrEP is taken before you think you might be exposed to HIV.

PEP is taken within 72 hours after exposure to HIV (e.g. after rape) for 28 days to prevent HIV. PeP is taken after you think you have been exposed to HIV.

ART is a 3-medicine treatment for HIV-positive people that reduces the levels of HIV in a person’s body. ART helps the body stay strong and helps it fight off infections and other illnesses.